Convincing UX design

Basic and expert knowledge for your team

You want to develop a product that offers great UX, but your team needs extended know-how for that? Build up the expertise that will give you the needed advantage in designing high-quality software.

You and your team will learn from our experienced trainers how to ideally set up the UX process and which set of tools is needed for it. Ranging from basic UX skills to expert knowledge – our UX Academy offers the matching hands-on training, learning from sample projects. The Centigrade UX Academy is based on:

  • Collaboration with international clients

    Collaboration with international clients

  • Years of<br>practical work

    Years of
    practical work

  • Continuous development of our UX process

    Continuous development of our UX process

  • Integration of new technologies and developments

    Integration of new technologies and developments

Training modules
for various
requirements

Our trainings are build as modules: Building blocks with a clearly defined content, thanks to which you are able to choose the training that is right for your needs and abilities. The number of available trainings is growing steadily: Next to practical skills like writing User Stories, developing scenarios with corresponding Personas or methods for finding new ideas, we offer knowhow about strategic planning of UX projects.

We focus on the seminar as a format in which you can become active yourselves on hands-on exercises. If you are more interested in a theoretical overview we are happy to present the topics in a compact and short talk.

Human-centred Design I
Introduction and basics from ISO 9241
Human-centred Design I

You want to develop efficient, satisfactory and sustainable systems? In order to create interactive systems that are user friendly products it is essential to focus on the user with all his human characteristics. The Human-centered Design approach uses knowledge about biological and social factors, expertise and abilities of the user or special user contexts. It should guide all steps of the development process for interactive systems. This workshop presents backgrounds and correlations, highlights requirements as described in ISO 9241-210 and demonstrates how Human-centred Design can be used in your own processes.

  • 2 Days

    2 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Clemens Lutsch
Human-centred Design I
Human-centred Design II
Methods and procedure from ISO 9241
Human-centred Design II

The deepening second part of the Human-centred Design training uses selected methods and procedures to describe different activities of the company in order to create a holistic and good user experience. In different exercise the chances and risks of the different methods will be revealed. Topics range from user research, user requirements management, to creative methods and norm accordant deliverables.

  • 2 Days

    2 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Clemens Lutsch
Human-centred Design II
UX Management
Do the right things
UX Management

UX Management will enable project teams to identify project goals and asses their business benefit from the UX perspective. By applying lean principles like MVPs (Minimum Viable Products) and design methods like personas and scenarios a common understanding for the goal of a UX-driven project can arise. Using structuring procedures like User Stories and assumptions the process can lead different disciplines to the development of a real product. The training contains the building blocks design thinking, project scoping as well as requirements engineering. All modules can be booked separately.

  • 2 - 3 Days

    2 - 3 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Thomas Immich
  • Jörg Niesenhaus
UX Management
Block 1: Understanding Design Thinking
Thinking outside the box
Block 1: Understanding Design Thinking

New business models, current technology and new services require an alternative, creative mode of operation in companies. Here design has to be the primary task, not a technical examination of functions and processes. The „Design Thinking“ approach puts humans in the center of this design tasks. We will together build a culture of challenging, creating and understanding your obstacles.

  • 2 Days

    2 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Clemens Lutsch
Block 1: Understanding Design Thinking
Block 2: Project Scoping
Finding the sweet spot in the yet unknown
Block 2: Project Scoping

To define the scope of a project is one of the most important steps in order to achieve a good result for the project with the resources available: Without a common understanding of the project goals the team will drift apart; without a strong business case the product can fail in its market.

This training will enable participants to understand the „scoping“ process and its components and to initiate own UX projects with the lean approach. Participants will learn with a hands-on sample project how to write a business statement, how to define their stakeholders, and how to identify and model their key persona. They understand how to develop a key scenario and derive a Minimum Viable Product from it.

  • 1 Day

    1 Day

  • Basics

    Basics

  • UX- and Project Manager<br>(Design) Engineers<br>UX-Teams

    UX- and Project Manager
    (Design) Engineers
    UX-Teams

  • Thomas Immich
  • Jörg Niesenhaus
Block 2: Project Scoping
Block 3: Requirements Engineering
Telling User Stories
Block 3: Requirements Engineering

Software systems are complex structures. Requirements for UX projects have to be precise and clearly understandable for all team members. However requirements are often phrased without a real user need at their core and their implementation often does not have a real benefit for the product. User Stories have a long tradition in agile software developement (e.g. SCRUM). In the process they are continuously charged throughout the course of the project with Scoped User Research activities up to a definition of done for implementation.

This training will teach you how to derive concrete user needs from scenarios, transfer those into correctly build user stories und by this reduce the project’s complexity into small implementable units.

  • 1 Day

    1 Day

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Thomas Immich
  • Jörg Niesenhaus
Block 3: Requirements Engineering
UX Design
Doing things right
UX Design

A common understanding of the project, as it can be reached by project scoping, is the first step to a successful UX project. Now you will learn how to put the agreed target course into action in a way that is operationally correct and connects the areas analysis, conception, design, specification and implementation without loosing information or the required continuity on the way.

You will learn how to verify central assumptions of your project by the means of Scoped User Research, how to generate ideas for interaction concepts and how to implement artifacts like wireframes. Together we will define strategies for the hand-over between different disciplines, so that you can successfully carry your UX project from conception through to implementation.

  • 2 - 3 Days

    2 - 3 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Product Owner<br>Project Manager<br>Management<br>UX-Teams

    Product Owner
    Project Manager
    Management
    UX-Teams

  • Thomas Immich
  • Jörg Niesenhaus
UX Design
Block 1: Scoped User Research
True and fictional stories
Block 1: Scoped User Research

Every project scheme is based on assumptions. Without testing those you risk your project to fail for example due to a wrong image of the workflow or by overestimating the qualification of the target group. In this training you will learn how to identify those and other risks at an early stage with the help of Scoped User Research. You will also learn how to document what you learned and thus be able to bring your scheme up to reality. Apart from strategies to minimize your project risks this training will present you with the appropriate user research methods.

  • 1 Day

    1 Day

  • Basics

    Basics

  • UX-Teams

    UX-Teams

  • Britta Karn
  • Jörg Niesenhaus
Block 1: Scoped User Research
Block 2: Design Engineering in the UX process (coming soon)
Block 2: Design Engineering in the UX process (coming soon)

Design engineering in the UX process. In this second partial module your software engineers learn how to efficiently and quickly transfer interaction concepts and visual designs from specs to live software. The module features the process through which designers and software engineers can collaborate using SCRUM user stories. The process is independent of technologies and programming languages. A successful implementation of the process only requires a separation of layers like in the MVVM architectural pattern.

In this module, you learn

  • Hand-off between visual/conceptual design and design engineering
  • Which project artifacts and assets should be handed over
  • How to read these specs and ask the right questions
  • How user stories facilitate the hand-over process
  • 1 - 2 Days

    1 - 2 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • (Design) Engineers

    (Design) Engineers

  • Alexander Keller
Block 2: Design Engineering in the UX process (coming soon)
The WPF First Aid Kit
The WPF First Aid Kit

No matter if you are a WPF freshman or are changing over from WinForms: You know that the learning curve for WFP is quite steep. Mixed with exterior influences like timely pressure chaos is lurking around the corner and one or the other workaround stays in the productive code. Be it befuddled Code-Behind, ViewModels with visibility features or multiply nested user controls that hopefully try to grab their DataContext without typification.

In this training you will learn how to avoid typical WPF-Anti-Patterns and misunderstandings as well as their negative effects on your MVVM architectures based on hands-on samples. In practical exercises you will work directly with the code and learn to build well maintainable and aesthetic software.

  • 1 Day

    1 Day

  • Basics

    Basics

  • (Design) Engineers

    (Design) Engineers

  • David Würfel
The WPF First Aid Kit
Gamification Level 1
Activating gamified potential in your company
Gamification Level 1

Playfully reaching more motivation and higher efficiency with Gamification. What is behind this? Gamification benefits from concepts and methods of behavioral and motivational psychology, User Interface Design as well as Game Design. In contrast to „Serious Games“, which transport benefits via a complete game, Gamification focuses on the targeted use of single playful elements in non-playful contexts.

This training explains basic factors of success and mechanics of digital games in order to transfer them to use cases of the real world. The primary focus is on

  • 2 Days

    2 Days

  • Basics

    Basics

  • Conceptual Designer<br>Manager

    Conceptual Designer
    Manager

  • Jörg Niesenhaus
Gamification Level 1
Clemens Lutsch

Clemens Lutsch has been working in the Usability / User Experience field since 1994. He manages and develops the area of strategic User Experience, which embraces new approaches in innovation management, organization development and the integration of human-centred design in corporate culture. The industrial anthropologist and trainer collaborates on a number of international standards in User Experience and Usability, recently as editor of ISO 9241 — Part 161: Guidance on visual user-interface elements. As a speaker at national and international conferences his topics ranges from human computer interaction to questions of media ethics and the human role in industry 4.0. He was department director at the German UPA and is advisor to the person certification at Fraunhofer institute.

Kai Deller

As a cognitive and media scientist Kai Deller concentrates on conception and design of Interaction. Having worked in the field of Journalism and PR, he also attends in the creation of information architecture and information design. His core responsibilities at Centigrade thereby result in conceptioning and prototyping. He also relays his competences as a tutor at different universities.

Thomas Immich

Thomas Immich is director of Centigrade and responsible for the company's UX Services division. He concentrates on user-centered design methods with regard to their technical feasibility and tool support. He is a regular speaker at well-known conferences and winner of awards like the „iF communication design award 2010“.

Jörg Niesenhaus

In his role as Head of Gamification he focuses on the evaluation and the conceptual design of user-friendly interfaces and modes of interaction. Thereby he also uses playful design elements to enhance the user satisfaction or process efficiency. During his time at the Interactive Systems and Interaction Design research group at the University of Duisburg-Essen he worked in the areas of HCI and usability engineering and was engaged in games research as well. Before his time at Centigrade Jörg Niesenhaus worked more than 11 years for game companies like Blue Byte, Similis and Ubisoft.

David Würfel

David Würfel studied Computer Science at the University of Trier and specialized in software engineering. He is particularly interested in software architectures, such as the MVVM pattern, and in ensuring clean code standards. David has successfully contributed in several .NET and WPF projects developing with C# and XAML and recently also takes part in projects building web applications in Angular. Not only does David Würfel like to share his skills internally, but he also leads workshops in companies and is an active speaker on well-known expert conferences.

Britta Karn

Britta Karn studied psychology at the Saarland University. During her studies she chose media informatics as a minor where she mainly focused on the topic of usability as an interface between psychology and informatics. With her knowledge on human cognition and perception and her methodological education she supports the Centigrade in the field of user research and with integrating insights about users in the design process.

Alexander Keller

Alexander Keller is Head of WPF Design Engineering at Centigrade. During his several years of developing WPF applications at Centigrade, Alexander Keller has managed numerous software projects in his function as technical project lead. He works at the intersection of User Interface Design and User Interface Development he joins technical know-how of C# engineering with esthetic UI Design in XAML. Furthermore, he supports clients in WPF performance analyses for better runtime behavior of their existing WPF applications.

You want your team to be more independent when it comes to UX and would like to learn more about how to put our know-how to good use? We are excited about your assignment.

Saskia Hehl

UX Academy

+49 681 959 31-07

Contact form

  • Saarbrücken

    Science Park Saar, Saarbrücken

    South West Location

    Headquarter Saarbrücken
    Centigrade GmbH
    Science Park 2
    66123 Saarbrücken
    Germany
    Saarland
    On the map

    +49 681 959 3110

    +49 681 959 3119

  • Mülheim an der Ruhr

    Games Factory Mühlheim an der Ruhr

    North West Location

    Office Mülheim
    Centigrade GmbH
    Kreuzstraße 1-3
    45468 Mülheim an der Ruhr
    Germany
    North Rhine-Westphalia
    On the map

    +49 208 883 672 89

    +49 681 959 3119

  • Haar · Munich

    Haar / München

    South Location

    Office Munich
    Centigrade GmbH
    Bahnhofstraße 18
    85540 Haar · Munich
    Germany
    Bavaria
    On the map

    +49 89 20 96 95 94

    +49 681 959 3119

  • Frankfurt am Main

    Frankfurt am Main

    Central Location

    Office Frankfurt
    Centigrade GmbH
    Kaiserstraße 61
    60329 Frankfurt am Main
    Germany
    Hesse
    On the map

    +49 69 241 827 91

    +49 681 959 3119